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Punchhi Commission| Composition of the Commission| Highlights|

The Government of India constituted a Commission on Centre-State Relations. Punchhi Commission was set up in 2007 by the Indian government to stud

Punchhi Commission


The Government of India constituted a Commission on Centre-State Relations. Punchhi Commission was set up in 2007 by the Indian government to study the system of governance in India and make recommendations for improving it. The Commission was headed by former Chief Justice of India M.N. Punchhi and submitted its report in 2010. The Commission's report made a number of recommendations regarding the structure of the Indian government, including the creation of a National Planning Commission and a National Security Council. It also suggested changes to the civil service, police, and judiciary.

What is the Punchhi Commission?

The Punchhi Commission, also known as the Punchhi Committee, was established in 2007 by the Indian government to review the country's constitutional structure and suggest changes. The commission was headed by former Chief Justice of India M.N. Venkatachaliah and submitted its report in 2010.

Who is on the Punchhi Commission?

The Punchhi Commission, also known as the Punchhi Committee, is a body established by the Government of India to review the country's central laws and suggest changes. The commission is headed by former Chief Justice of India Mukul Mudgal. Its members include retired judges, academics, and legal experts.

What is the Punchhi Committee's mandate?

The Punchhi Commission, also known as the National Commission on Population, was set up by the Government of India in 2000. The commission is headed by Justice (Retd.) M. S. Puncchhi and its members are drawn from different walks of life including administrators, demographers, medical doctors and social scientists. The commission's key task is to prepare a report on the state of population in India and make recommendations for population policy. In doing so, the commission will take into account factors such as socio-economic development, environmental concerns and women's empowerment.

What has the Punchhi Commission accomplished so far?

The Punchhi Commission has been working hard to improve the conditions of the Indian Police Force. So far, they have accomplished a great deal in just a short amount of time.

One of their biggest accomplishments has been the introduction of the Police Act 2007. This act provides various guidelines and reforms that are aimed at improving the functioning of the police force. Some of the key provisions of this act include making police accountable to the public, establishing a Police Complaints Authority, and setting up a National Police Mission.

The Commission has also worked on improving training and infrastructure for the police force. They have set up new training institutes and upgraded existing ones. They have also provided financial assistance for the construction of new police stations and other infrastructure projects.

In addition, the Commission has taken several steps to improve the welfare of police personnel. They have introduced a new pension scheme for retired police officers and implemented measures to provide better medical facilities for serving officers.

The Punchhi Commission has made great strides in improving the Indian Police Force. With their continued efforts, it is hoped that even more progress will be made in the years to come.

What are the challenges facing the Punchhi Commission?

The challenges facing the Punchhi Commission are numerous and varied. Firstly, the Commission has been tasked with the unenviable task of reviewing and making recommendations on the very sensitive issue of Centre-State relations in India. This is a complex and emotive issue, with strong views held on both sides. The Commission will need to tread carefully in its deliberations in order to come up with a report that is acceptable to all parties.

Secondly, the Commission has a tight deadline within which to complete its work. It has been given just six months to submit its report, which may not be enough time to properly consider all the issues at hand and consult with all the relevant stakeholders.

Thirdly, the Commission does not have any dedicated staff or resources of its own and is reliant on government departments and agencies for assistance. This could lead to delays in receiving information or getting expert input on certain matters.

Fourthly, there is a risk that the Commission’s recommendations could be ignored or not implemented due to political considerations. Given the sensitive nature of Centre-State relations, any proposed changes are likely to be controversial and may not find favour with either the central government or state governments.
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Punchhi Commission

The Punchhi Commission, also known as the Punchhi Committee, was a committee set up by the Indian government to look into the issue of center-state relations in India. The commission was headed by Justice (Retd.) Balbir Singh Chauhan and submitted its report in 2010. The commission made several recommendations with regard to improving center-state relations, which included devolving more powers to the states and setting up of a permanent secretariat for inter-state coordination.

Composition of the Commission

  1. Shri Justice Madan Mohan Punchhi (Retd.), Former Chief Justice of India, Chairman
  2. Shri Dhirendra Singh, Former Secretary to the Government of India, Member
  3. Shri Vinod Kumar Duggal, Former Secretary to the Government of India, Member
  4. Dr. N.R. Madhava Menon, Former Director, National Judicial Academy, Bhopal, and National Law School of India, Bangalore, Member
  5. Shri Vijay Shanker, IPS (Retd.), Former Director, Central Bureau of Investigation, Govt of India, Member Secretary

Highlights:

To examine what could be the role, responsibility and jurisdiction of the Centre during major and prolonged outbreaks of communal violence, caste violence or any other social conflicts.
To review other aspects of Centre-States relations including taxes and linking of rivers.
To examine whether there is a need to set up a Central law enforcement agency to take up suo motu investigation of crimes having inter-State or international ramifications with serious implications on national security.
To study the feasibility of supporting legislation under Article 355 for the purpose of suo motu deployment of Central forces in the States if and when the situation demanded.
To study the role, responsibility and jurisdiction of the Centre vis-à-vis States in promoting effective devolution of powers and autonomy to Panchayati Raj institutions and local bodies.
To promote the concept and concept of independent planning and budgeting at the district level and linking Central assistance of various kinds with the performance of the States.
To study the need and relevance of separate taxes for freeing inter-state trade to establish unified domestic market.
To examine the role of Governors, emergency provisions, financial relations, economic and social planning, Panchayati Raj institutions and sharing of resources, including inter-State river waters.

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